Where Are Psilocybins Legal To Treat PTSD?

Where Are Psilocybins Legal To Treat PTSD?

Veteran Families Can Find Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy

Our mission is clearly on the side of postvention and to be there ASAP for the family left behind after a suicide. Many times they have witnessed the Veteran suicide or heard it. We urge families to research this micro-dosing information as an option to heal their Veterans as well as themselves.

Once A Soldier does not endorse any listed facilities but presents them as a resource for further investigation. A Google search with the terms “psychedelic treatment centers near me” will also provide similar results.

Find a Psycheledic Center Near You

Despite the huge therapeutic potential, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy is not part of standard medical care yet. Self-medicating with psychedelics can produce undesired results, but despite that, more and more people feel disappointed with the efficacy of the current treatments and they turn to risky, but potentially more beneficial psychedelic-assisted therapy. Source

Just updated: this site will connect you a national listing of pyschotherapists with a vareity of educational backgrounds, specialties and locations.

Like our Veterans Suicide Rates by State, this ever-growing resource is a big part o four mission. Education after a Veteran suicide can help ease the scars for the family. We are proud to be that resource for them but want to reach more and more families. This is a new resource for Once A Soldier, and we will do our best to add more centers that fit our mission parameters when we can. Please check back often for updates.

Arizona

Despite Arizona’s strict drug laws and conservative political climate, the psilocybin decriminalization movement is gaining traction within the state’s borders. In both Tempe and Tucson, there are two major organizations fighting to decriminalize psychedelics.

Psychedelic Club of Phoenix

Arizona Psychedelics

Modern Spirit

California

For several years, California has been at the forefront of psychedelic policy reform. In 2019, Oakland became the first city in the country to decriminalize a wide variety of psychedelics, including psilocybin mushrooms and ayahuasca. “It’s time to take a health and science-oriented approach to drugs & step away from knee-jerk criminalization,” State Senator Scott Wiener tweeted on November 15, 2020. Psychedelics have medicinal value and should not be prohibited. As a result, when the Legislature reconvenes, we’ll try to make their use legal.”

Center of psychedelic studies and research

Psychedelic Therapy Center

Pacific Brain Health Center

Colorado

With this psilocybin vote, Denver is breaking new ground. Colorado and the Mile High City are poised to anchor an ongoing psychedelic revival, where once-maligned psychoactive substances are being championed as therapeutic treatments for illnesses including anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder, thanks to voter-approved legislation forcing police to relax enforcement of laws around psilocybin mushrooms.

Innate Path

Medicinal Mindfulness

Kathy Hawkins Counseling

Prati Group

Home

Enduring Love Therapy

New York

Despite the huge therapeutic potential, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy is not part of standard medical care yet. Self-medicating with psychedelics can produce undesired results, but despite that, more and more people feel disappointed with the efficacy of the current treatments and they turn to risky, but potentially more beneficial psychedelic-assisted therapy. The goal of this guide is harm reduction for people, who decided to self-medicate, we don’t encourage possession or consumption of illicit substances even for therapeutic endeavors.

Field Trip Health

Psychedelic society of western NY

New York city psychedelic society

Center for Optimal Living

Nushama

Mindbloom

Georgia

In the state of Georiga, the future of psilocybin does not appear bright. In addition to a series of rigorous laws banning the selling and possession of “magic mushrooms,” the state is one of the few in the world to recognize psilocybin mushroom spores as controlled substances in their own right.

Emory University (Atlanta) researchers are looking into using psychedelic drugs as a possible treatment for major depressive disorder.

ONAC

Illinois

In the state of Illinois, psilocybin is highly illegal. Though Chicago officials have suggested and contemplated decriminalization within the city limits, these efforts have failed. Psilocybin is currently classified as a Schedule I controlled drug in both Chicago and the rest of Illinois.

Safer Illinois

Psychedelic safety support and integration in Chicago

Psychelics Are Also Know As

Psychedelics, also known as psychedelic drugs, hallucinogens, or hallucinogenic drugs are chemical substances that induce hallucinations and other sensory disturbances.

Psychedelic – relating to or denoting drugs that produce hallucinations and apparent expansion of consciousness. Psychedelics were originally called ‘Psychotomimetics’ by the scientific community (mimicking the effect of a psychotic state). In 1956, Humphry Osmond coined the term Psychedelic (‘Mind Manifesting’ in Greek) in a letter to writer Aldous Huxley.

Entheogen – a psychoactive substance that induces alterations in perception, mood, consciousness, cognition, or behaviofor the purposes of engendering spiritual development in sacred contexts.

Psilocybin – a naturally occurring psychedelic prodrug compound produced by more than 200 species of mushrooms, collectively known as psilocybin mushrooms.

DMT (N,N-Dimethyltryptamine) – a chemical substance that occurs in many plants and animals and which is both a derivative and a structural analog of tryptamine.[3] It can be consumed as a psychedelic drug and has historically been prepared by various cultures for ritual purposes as an entheogen. DMT has a rapid onset, intense effects, and a relatively short duration of action.

LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide) – also known colloquially as acid, is a hallucinogenic drug.Effects typically include altered thoughts, feelings, and awareness of one’s surroundings.

 

    About Once a Soldier

    Once a Soldier’s mission is to help the families after a soldier suicide. Most soldier suicides are performed by veterans who have lost touch with the VA and their families won’t be getting any financial help from the government at this critical time. Even when they do, the support is limited. We aspire to fill or close that gap especially when it comes to the heartbreak of paying funeral costs. But this post aspires to be a place where someone in need RIGHT NOW can get some help for themselves or for a loved one who’s thinking about suicide.

    Once A Soldier Funds First Ketamine-IV Drip Therapy

    Once A Soldier Funds First Ketamine-IV Drip Therapy

     Finally, Effective Treatment for Suicidal Veterans & Their Families 

    How long do PTSD Veterans and their families have to wait for psilocybin treatment to get going? While Congress idles with no answers, some Vets are going out of the country for this treatment. We can do better here at home and we are. Our answer to how long is “no longer.” Help is needed now as more and more Veterans are committing suicide at an alarming rate above the civilian average.

    Putting our money where our hearts are, Once A Soldier is defraying the costs of a full six sessions of Ketamine IV drip treatments. James Simpson and his wife Jennifer are both combat Veterans. It is our intent for James to defeat his PTSD with this grant. We know he will.

     

    ketamin iv drip

    Ketamine Clinics Are Already Functional Around the Nation

    The initial call from James’ wife Jennifer spurred Once A Soldier to monetize their prevention efforts with this first-ever grant. Treatment will be at the Virginia Beach Ketamine and Wellness starting in February 2022. Private, out-of-pocket clinics like this are all over the country, and we have partnered with two here in Jacksonville during our service time. We wish the Simpson family the best and will update James’ progress in this blog.

    Once A Soldier has always been a resource for Veteran suicide prevention and information. Our mission started as – and still is – postvention, but we have grown to offer prevention help for both Veteran and family, pre and postvention. Note our scholarships for Equine-Assisted Therapy for Veterans and their families here in north Florida, as well as our Transcendental Meditation scholarships which has been granted around the country now that COVID-19 has changed. Despite the apparent dichotomy, we have also championed other free and drug-free mental health treatments.

    We are first, but we are not alone.

    Back in 2021, a collection of the largest Veteran service organizations implored Congress to fast track the journey towards adding psilocybin to prevent Veteran suicide. Across America, renowned institutions such as Johns Hopkins University and Stanford University run psychedelic research centers and medical groups. They see the future. With 20 Veteran suicides a day, and the reason they suicide, something advanced needs to be considered. And they are. Meanwhile, Once A Soldier has grant a modest amount to enable That is a big ask as some psilocybins currently sit in Category 1 with heroin. Ketamine is considered a Schedule 3 because it is so hard to make. However, r

    There are US Veterans leaving the country to seek this type of medical treatment. Surely, we can find our way faster for their sake.

    Virginia Beach Ketamine and Wellness owners

    James Stephen Oleksa, MD Anesthesiology,Medical Director and Sentara Princess Anne Hospital, Virginia Beach, VA.

    Virginia Beach Ketamine and Wellness owners

    Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists Carolanne Garofalo and Tricia Lee are co-owners at Virginia Beach Ketamine and Wellness.

    ABOUT ONCE A SOLDIER

    Our Veterans are killing themselves in record numbers mostly due to PTSD. An overmatched VA can’t take care of them or their families. We will.

    Soldier suicide leaves Veteran families with thousands of dollars of bills unpaid, mostly bank loans.

    We are the only nonprofit standing with the families after a veteran suicide. Stand with us.

    Our Mission: Become the preferred channel for donors, advocates and volunteers who care about veteran families left behind after a soldier suicide.

    Why Veterans Are Reluctant to Get Mental Help

    Why Veterans Are Reluctant to Get Mental Help

    A Special Mental Health Resource for Once A Soldier

    Mental health continues to be one of the biggest issues facing veterans today. Statistics have shown that a full third of U.S. veterans return from active duty reporting problems with mental health. And the suicide statics for veterans are sobering: 17 U.S. military veterans per day commit suicide, making it the second leading cause of death among post-911 veterans.

    There’s another grim statistic, too: despite this, less than 50% of veterans receive mental health support of any kind. One cause of this is mental health services for veterans being severely underfunded and understaffed; although 1 in 10 veterans will return from active duty with some kind of long-term mental health issue like PTSD, there aren’t enough resources or staff to help everyone.

    But there’s another reason why veterans aren’t getting all the mental health support they need: many of them don’t seek it out in the first place. In particular, many veterans without close friends or family are unlikely to pursue receiving treatment for mental health issues. Many others aren’t aware they’re eligible for help, or aren’t even aware such help is available.

    Reasons Veterans Resist Help with Mental Health

    There’s another grim statistic, too: despite this, less than 50% of veterans receive mental health support of any kind. One cause of this is mental health services for veterans being severely underfunded and understaffed; although 1 in 10 veterans will return from active duty with some kind of long-term mental health issue like PTSD, there aren’t enough resources or staff to help everyone.

    But there’s another reason why veterans aren’t getting all the mental health support they need: many of them don’t seek it out in the first place. In particular, many veterans without close friends or family are unlikely to pursue receiving treatment for mental health issues. Many others aren’t aware they’re eligible for help, or aren’t even aware such help is available.

    So why don’t veterans get the mental health help they need? Let’s look at some of the more common reasons.

    They’re trained to “suck it up.” Acknowledging and accepting the presence of mental health problems is already a major obstacle for anyone suffering from mental illness. But the problem can be exacerbated by military training and culture, which encourages soldiers to “bite the bullet” and forge ahead despite hindrances or obstacles. While this attitude can be critical in military situations, it isn’t helpful when dealing with mental health, and may lead to self-medication through drugs or alcohol.

    They view it as weakness or fear being minimized. One very common fear among sufferers of mental illness is the thought of confessing their issues to someone (already a stressful and anxiety-inducing experience in itself) and being told that it’s “all in their head” or they just need to “cheer up” or otherwise endure the problem. This can further alienate and isolate the person, possibly exacerbating the mental issues. In particular, veterans may be wary of being open with their problems out of fear for their careers, or, if they’re a single parent, worrying their children might be taken away.

    While a certain amount of hesitation is understandable, the armed services are adamant about mental health being just as important as physical health to mission success. The real dangers to one’s military career actually stems from not disclosing their illness or seeking treatment for it. Despite funding and staffing issues, the military still considers it important for soldiers and veterans to take care of their mental health.

    They’re unaware of changes in the behavior Denial is an extremely common issue for those suffering from mental illness, no matter what their background. A person may not be aware their outlook or behavior has changed following a trauma or incident. Even once they do realize something is different, they might still deny that it’s an issue. This can lead back to the problems of self-medication, hiding the problem, or going on denying it exists.

    They don’t believe therapy is worthwhile. Therapy still has a negative stigma in our popular culture. It’s common for many to feel that therapy is a scam, not useful, or wouldn’t be useful to them in particular due to their personality or circumstances. Resistance to therapy is extremely common, but knowledge of the usefulness of therapy is slowly growing.

    They can’t afford mental health services. Even when veterans know where to turn to find resources to help them, those resources may be beyond their financial reach. Insurance will sometimes cover some mental health costs, but rarely all, and some veterans may find themselves feeling they can’t afford it, and don’t know where to turn to get assistance.

    Where Veterans Can Turn for Help

    Fortunately, while there are ongoing issues with mental health services for veterans getting enough staff and funding, there are still options available for those seeking assistance, including:

    • The local veteran’s affairs department. The VA not only provides instant help in the form of hotlines and online chat, but can also point veterans to resources in their area.
    • Community social services (if they have a nurse or social worker trained in mental health).
    • Non-profit organizations that assist veterans.
    • Private psychologists and therapists. Many insurance companies offer a certain amount of paid sessions for people seeking help from a private practice.
    • Look into joining a veteran’s support group.
    • Groups such as the National Suicide Lifeline offer instant support for people in need.
    • Your religious organization may also be of help to those not wanting to seek out a secular solution. Many pastors, rabbis and imams are trained in social work helping people with mental health issues and can provide aid and guidance.
    • There are even mental health apps available for those who want or need some immediate help.

    There are also a variety of other mental health services for veterans seeking help. If you or someone you know is a veteran struggling with mental health issues, consider helping them get in touch with one or more of these resources.

    ABOUT ONCE A SOLDIER

    Our Veterans are killing themselves in record numbers mostly due to PTSD. An overmatched VA can’t take care of them or their families. We will.

    Soldier suicide leaves Veteran families with thousands of dollars of bills unpaid, mostly bank loans.

    We are the only nonprofit standing with the families after a veteran suicide. Stand with us.

    Our Mission: Become the preferred channel for donors, advocates and volunteers who care about veteran families left behind after a soldier suicide.

    Speaking On A National Crisis With Representative Rutherford

    Speaking On A National Crisis With Representative Rutherford

     “Positive Progress”
    The Latest on Stopping Veteran Suicide

    Speakers Forum on October 25, 2020

    Every two days, more United States veterans die by suicide than were killed in action during all of last year. But despite this disturbing statistic, and after almost nineteen years of post-9/11 conflicts, lawmakers and Defense Department officials still are no closer to ending the suicide crisis affecting veterans and their families throughout the country. The issue is complex – Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) can manifest itself in a multitude of ways, and there isn’t any guarantee for mental health care access to the veterans who need it most.

    John Rutherford

    John Rutherford

    Congressman (R) from District 4 - FL

    St. Augustine Event Presented by Once A Soldier

    “Positive Progress” Speakers Forum featuring Rep. John Rutherford
    When: October 25, 2020 from 6pm to 7:30 pm
    Where: Gourmet Hut (17 Cuna Street, St. Augustine, FL)
    Admission: Free — Seating is Limited to 45 Attendees
    Complimentary hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine

    Reserve Your Seat Here 


    ABOUT THE EVENT

    Once A Soldier’s team is dedicated to helping families in the United States who have been affected by a veteran’s suicide. It is our main mission to provide financial aid to families burdened by funeral and other expenses when a veteran they love takes their own life. In order to take our mission to the next level, and help even more families in need, we have been working with the Congressional Representative from Florida’s Fourth District, Rep. John Rutherford. Representative Rutherford and his team have listened to the needs of our organization and understand the scope of the problem our nation is facing when it comes to veteran suicide.

    In order to raise awareness of this important issue right here in the Northeast Florida community, Representative Rutherford will be speaking at the Gourmet Hut (17 Cuna Street, St. Augustine, FL) on October 25th from 6:00pm to 7:30pm. Along with other speakers from a veteran-owned PTSD clinic, and a father of a fallen soldier, Rep. Rutherford will be speaking about what it takes to combat the veteran and soldier suicide crisis. Get the details here.

    Hosted outdoors in historic downtown St. Augustine, “Positive Progress – The Latest on Stopping Veteran Suicide” promises to set the standard on how we can tackle this issue from all sides and start saving lives. Rep. Rutherford will discuss how this will take a combined effort from the both legislative branch and the private sector. He will also share stories from the front lines to bring this issue completely into focus.

    After the speakers have wrapped up, Once A Soldier will host a question and answer session. This is a great opportunity to speak one-on-one with the Founder and discuss any of our current and future initiatives. In addition, there will be complimentary beer, wine, and hors d’oeuvres available throughout at the event. This is the only event of it’s kind and the outdoor seating is limited.

    To abide by social distancing guidelines, all seating will be spaced appropriately, and masks are mandatory.

    If you are interested in attending this free event, RSVP here!

    ABOUT ONCE A SOLDIER

    Our Veterans are killing themselves in record numbers mostly due to PTSD. An overmatched VA can’t take care of them or their families. We will.

    Soldier suicide leaves Veteran families with thousands of dollars of bills unpaid, mostly bank loans.

    We are the only nonprofit standing with the families after a veteran suicide. Stand with us.

    Our Mission: Become the preferred channel for donors, advocates and volunteers who care about veteran families left behind after a soldier suicide.