Florida Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy Clinics

Florida Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy Clinics

New Mental Health Breakthroughs Are Now Mainstream Services All Across America

Our mission is to prevent veteran suicide using cutting-edge treatments and also to take care of the veteran family when prevention fails. All the promising research for new ways to fight mental health illnesses have pointed towards previously forbidden drugs like ketamine, MDMA and psilocybin. Although still at least a Schedule 3 drug according to the FDA, they are saving lives. Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy (KAP) seems to have risen to the top. KAP treatment centers are opening up all across America and mid-to-major cities all have multiple options.

See the Glossary of KAP Terms

Florida Ketamine-Assisted Psychotherapy Clinics

Jacksonville Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy

Revitalist
6871 Belfort Oaks Place Suite 2 Jacksonville, FL 32216
904-204-1182
Email jacksonville@revitalist.com
Monday – Friday 8:00am – 4:00pm

Ketamine Therapeutics
3685 Crown Point Rd Suite D · (904) 662-1485
Open ⋅ Closes 4PM

Ketamine Wellness Centers – Jacksonville, Florida
3753-2 Cardinal Point Dr
(855) 538-9355
Open ⋅ Closes 6PM

Ketamine Academy
(386) 433-2143
Open ⋅ Closes 5PM
Online classes

The Practice
3547 Hendricks Ave
Jacksonville , FL 32207

Best Ketamine Clinics
8833 Perimeter Park Blvd., Suite #1004
Jacksonville, FL 32216

Satyen Madkaiker, MD, FAPA
3685 Crown Point Court
Jacksonville, FL 32257

First Coast Wellness Infusions and Ketamine Clinic
1100 Plantation Island Dr S
STE 140
St. Augustine, FL 32080
(855) 258-0325

What Is Ketamine & How Does It Work?

Definition of ketamine: a general anesthetic that is administered intravenously and intramuscularly in the form of its hydrochloride C13H16ClNO·HCl and that is used illicitly usually by being inhaled in powdered form, especially for the dreamlike or hallucinogenic state it produces.

More and more research facilities like Stanford University and Johns Hopkins continue to explore the ways this disassociative drug can help us all on the way to better mental health. But how does it work?

Chronic stress weakens neural connections in the brain over time. Depression actually decreases the number of synapses in the brain. Ketamine works directly to restore these connections. It binds to the NMDA receptor and releases a glutamate surge. This in turn releases growth factors, like BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), which help make new synaptic connections and pave healthier thought patterns in the brain.

The unique experience that ketamine facilitates with its biological, experiential, and psychological impacts has been tailored to optimize office-based treatment evolving into a method that we call Ketamine Assisted Psychotherapy (KAP).

PTSD Definition

PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) is a mental health problem that some people – soldiers and civilians – develop after experiencing or witnessing a life-threatening event, like combat, a natural disaster, a car accident, or sexual assault.

It’s normal to have upsetting memories, feel on edge, or have trouble sleeping after this type of event. At first, it may be hard to do normal daily activities, like go to work, go to school, or spend time with people you care about, but most people start to feel better after a few weeks or months. If it’s been longer than a few months and you’re still having symptoms, you may have PTSD.

About Once A Soldier

Starting in 2017, our mission is to limit the scars of Veteran suicide. We offer prevention services and postvention services. We reach a national audience and our goal is to become the preferred channel for those who want to help Veteran families who need our services. With 17 Veteran suicides a day in 2021, we believe our two niche services will make a difference to each family and to our nation.

Most Common Misconception of Psychedelic Therapy

Most Common Misconception of Psychedelic Therapy

Thoughts from a Founding Member of the Johns Hopkins Center for Psychedelic and Consciousness Research and the International Society for Research on Psychedelics

Albert Garcia-Romeu, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research examines the effects of psychedelics in humans, with a focus on psilocybin as an aid in the treatment of addiction.

Once A Soldier offers grants to partially pay for treatment for a Veteran with PTSD.

In this interview with Psychedelic Finance, Dr. Garcia-Romeu addresses a key point that we feel needs to be heard more. 

What do you believe is the most common misconception about psychedelics?

To me, one of the most common and problematic misconceptions about psychedelics is that they are some sort of silver bullet that will solve people’s problems outright. A lot of the narratives I’ve seen proliferated through media and pop culture make it seem as though people come in for a drug session one day and simply walk out healed, transformed, freed from a lifetime of ego entanglements and interpersonal dynamics, and unfortunately this is not the case.

(Note from the Editor: We understand Dr. Garcia-Romeu’s point of view, but we would push back on two points. One is that we’ve talked to Veterans who underwent ketamine infusion therapy with fast-acting and long-lasting results. Second, in a clinical setting, their subjects were not PTSD riddled Veterans. Perhaps this type of treatment is a bullseye to shoot at combat PTSD?)

I think it really speaks to a natural human desire to have our troubles whisked away without anything required on our part, like finding a winning lottery ticket, or perhaps in more religious terms to ‘be saved’. While this can be nice in theory, it sidesteps the reality of the situation which is that change can be difficult, and even if we ourselves put in the work to change that does not mean the circumstances or people around us will follow suit. As a result, people may have truly profound, eye-opening psychedelic experiences that in the end don’t amount to much in terms of real-world changes. They can leave with a vision of a better life, an image of a more actualized self, but if they don’t put that into practice it goes nowhere, just like if I spent lots of time reading about how to get in great shape but never bothered working out.

Sometimes people can go to great lengths to make personal changes but then go back to an environment or relationships that over time wear them back down into the status quo. I think of people checking into inpatient detox and rehabilitation clinics for drug use. They leave where they come from, the relationships where they developed these addictive or other unhealthy tendencies, and with some work they can make wonderful strides toward healing and recovery. But send them back to where they came from and oftentimes they settle right back into old patterns and that work can be undone. I’ve seen similar things even after powerful psychedelic experiences. Conversely, I’ve seen some people have puzzling, quizzical experiences that don’t seem particularly insightful or meaningful, that don’t fit our nice, neat rubrics of mystical experience or emotional breakthrough, and yet over time get a lot of mileage and positive impact from those experiences even though they walk out thinking, “that wasn’t at all spectacular.”

So, I suppose this comes back to the idea that we don’t really know how people change and what role psychedelics can play in that process, but of course, the data are very promising and we will continue to study and try to learn more. On a larger scale, in terms of social issues, I would also say that we need to move away from this type of magical thinking that something like science or psychedelics will come along and save us, which is exemplified in popular media articles with titles like, ‘Can Psychedelics Save the World?’. If anything or anyone is going to save the world in these dire times, it will have to be us, regular people who come together to work towards a sustainable future. Psychedelics can be tools to move us in that direction, but we’ll be the ones who will actually have to roll up our sleeves, get our hands dirty, and start making large-scale changes with regards to geopolitics, economics, environmentalism, and so forth. Mushrooms and DMT and the like are not going to do these things for us.

There’s an old Zen saying, “Before enlightenment; chop wood, carry water. After enlightenment; chop wood, carry water.” I think this points to the paradox that even after the most transcendent, earth-shattering experience imaginable, we still come back to ourselves and our lives and all the various tasks that entails. Everything has changed, but nothing has changed, and so we must go on with the work of doing our best, being our best selves, and sometimes these psychedelic experiences can be a little lighthouse to help keep us going on the right path.

Other Psychelics That Help With PTSD

Psychedelics, also known as psychedelic drugs, hallucinogens, or hallucinogenic drugs are chemical substances that induce hallucinations and other sensory disturbances.

Psychedelic – relating to or denoting drugs that produce hallucinations and apparent expansion of consciousness. Psychedelics were originally called ‘Psychotomimetics’ by the scientific community (mimicking the effect of a psychotic state). In 1956, Humphry Osmond coined the term Psychedelic (‘Mind Manifesting’ in Greek) in a letter to writer Aldous Huxley.

Entheogen – a psychoactive substance that induces alterations in perception, mood, consciousness, cognition, or behaviofor the purposes of engendering spiritual development in sacred contexts.

Psilocybin – a naturally occurring psychedelic prodrug compound produced by more than 200 species of mushrooms, collectively known as psilocybin mushrooms.

DMT (N,N-Dimethyltryptamine) – a chemical substance that occurs in many plants and animals and which is both a derivative and a structural analog of tryptamine.[3] It can be consumed as a psychedelic drug and has historically been prepared by various cultures for ritual purposes as an entheogen. DMT has a rapid onset, intense effects, and a relatively short duration of action.

LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide) – also known colloquially as acid, is a hallucinogenic drug.Effects typically include altered thoughts, feelings, and awareness of one’s surroundings.

About Once a Soldier

Once a Soldier’s mission is to help the families after a soldier suicide. Most soldier suicides are performed by veterans who have lost touch with the VA and their families won’t be getting any financial help from the government at this critical time. Even when they do, the support is limited. We aspire to fill or close that gap especially when it comes to the heartbreak of paying funeral costs. But this post aspires to be a place where someone in need RIGHT NOW can get some help for themselves or for a loved one who’s thinking about suicide.

Where Are Psilocybins Legal To Treat PTSD?

Where Are Psilocybins Legal To Treat PTSD?

Veteran Families Can Find Psychedelic-Assisted Psychotherapy

Our mission is clearly on the side of postvention and to be there ASAP for the family left behind after a suicide. Many times they have witnessed the Veteran suicide or heard it. We urge families to research this micro-dosing information as an option to heal their Veterans as well as themselves.

Once A Soldier does not endorse any listed facilities but presents them as a resource for further investigation. A Google search with the terms “psychedelic treatment centers near me” will also provide similar results.

Find a Psycheledic Center Near You

Despite the huge therapeutic potential, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy is not part of standard medical care yet. Self-medicating with psychedelics can produce undesired results, but despite that, more and more people feel disappointed with the efficacy of the current treatments and they turn to risky, but potentially more beneficial psychedelic-assisted therapy. Source

Just updated: this site will connect you a national listing of pyschotherapists with a vareity of educational backgrounds, specialties and locations.

Like our Veterans Suicide Rates by State, this ever-growing resource is a big part o four mission. Education after a Veteran suicide can help ease the scars for the family. We are proud to be that resource for them but want to reach more and more families. This is a new resource for Once A Soldier, and we will do our best to add more centers that fit our mission parameters when we can. Please check back often for updates.

Arizona

Despite Arizona’s strict drug laws and conservative political climate, the psilocybin decriminalization movement is gaining traction within the state’s borders. In both Tempe and Tucson, there are two major organizations fighting to decriminalize psychedelics.

Psychedelic Club of Phoenix

Arizona Psychedelics

Modern Spirit

California

For several years, California has been at the forefront of psychedelic policy reform. In 2019, Oakland became the first city in the country to decriminalize a wide variety of psychedelics, including psilocybin mushrooms and ayahuasca. “It’s time to take a health and science-oriented approach to drugs & step away from knee-jerk criminalization,” State Senator Scott Wiener tweeted on November 15, 2020. Psychedelics have medicinal value and should not be prohibited. As a result, when the Legislature reconvenes, we’ll try to make their use legal.”

Center of psychedelic studies and research

Psychedelic Therapy Center

Pacific Brain Health Center

Colorado

With this psilocybin vote, Denver is breaking new ground. Colorado and the Mile High City are poised to anchor an ongoing psychedelic revival, where once-maligned psychoactive substances are being championed as therapeutic treatments for illnesses including anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder, thanks to voter-approved legislation forcing police to relax enforcement of laws around psilocybin mushrooms.

Innate Path

Medicinal Mindfulness

Kathy Hawkins Counseling

Prati Group

Home

Enduring Love Therapy

New York

Despite the huge therapeutic potential, psychedelic-assisted psychotherapy is not part of standard medical care yet. Self-medicating with psychedelics can produce undesired results, but despite that, more and more people feel disappointed with the efficacy of the current treatments and they turn to risky, but potentially more beneficial psychedelic-assisted therapy. The goal of this guide is harm reduction for people, who decided to self-medicate, we don’t encourage possession or consumption of illicit substances even for therapeutic endeavors.

Field Trip Health

Psychedelic society of western NY

New York city psychedelic society

Center for Optimal Living

Nushama

Mindbloom

Georgia

In the state of Georiga, the future of psilocybin does not appear bright. In addition to a series of rigorous laws banning the selling and possession of “magic mushrooms,” the state is one of the few in the world to recognize psilocybin mushroom spores as controlled substances in their own right.

Emory University (Atlanta) researchers are looking into using psychedelic drugs as a possible treatment for major depressive disorder.

ONAC

Illinois

In the state of Illinois, psilocybin is highly illegal. Though Chicago officials have suggested and contemplated decriminalization within the city limits, these efforts have failed. Psilocybin is currently classified as a Schedule I controlled drug in both Chicago and the rest of Illinois.

Safer Illinois

Psychedelic safety support and integration in Chicago

Psychelics Are Also Know As

Psychedelics, also known as psychedelic drugs, hallucinogens, or hallucinogenic drugs are chemical substances that induce hallucinations and other sensory disturbances.

Psychedelic – relating to or denoting drugs that produce hallucinations and apparent expansion of consciousness. Psychedelics were originally called ‘Psychotomimetics’ by the scientific community (mimicking the effect of a psychotic state). In 1956, Humphry Osmond coined the term Psychedelic (‘Mind Manifesting’ in Greek) in a letter to writer Aldous Huxley.

Entheogen – a psychoactive substance that induces alterations in perception, mood, consciousness, cognition, or behaviofor the purposes of engendering spiritual development in sacred contexts.

Psilocybin – a naturally occurring psychedelic prodrug compound produced by more than 200 species of mushrooms, collectively known as psilocybin mushrooms.

DMT (N,N-Dimethyltryptamine) – a chemical substance that occurs in many plants and animals and which is both a derivative and a structural analog of tryptamine.[3] It can be consumed as a psychedelic drug and has historically been prepared by various cultures for ritual purposes as an entheogen. DMT has a rapid onset, intense effects, and a relatively short duration of action.

LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide) – also known colloquially as acid, is a hallucinogenic drug.Effects typically include altered thoughts, feelings, and awareness of one’s surroundings.

 

    About Once a Soldier

    Once a Soldier’s mission is to help the families after a soldier suicide. Most soldier suicides are performed by veterans who have lost touch with the VA and their families won’t be getting any financial help from the government at this critical time. Even when they do, the support is limited. We aspire to fill or close that gap especially when it comes to the heartbreak of paying funeral costs. But this post aspires to be a place where someone in need RIGHT NOW can get some help for themselves or for a loved one who’s thinking about suicide.

    What Will Returning Afghanistan Veterans Mean to Families?

    What Will Returning Afghanistan Veterans Mean to Families?

    More Veteran Suicides And More Families Traumatized

    With President Biden finishing off what three previous administrations couldn’t, the end of the war in Afghanistan means many soldiers will coming stateside. While most of them will not be discharged, some will turn into Afghanistan Veterans. It is those returning Afghanistan warriors that we worry about. If they are like a percentage of their predecessors, they will have PTSD. Here’s what we know: PTSD and families don’t mix. 

    Despite the good news coming from the Veterans Administration about soldier suicide being on the decline, the numbers are still painful to accept. In 2019, there were 6,261 Veteran suicides. That’s down from the all time high of 2017. See the newly leased Veteran suicide report by clicking on the cover image.

    Overall, civilian suicides are also lower in the past few years, so the Veterans are benefitting from a national trend that is, in turn, either benefitting from greater awareness and acceptability when it comes to asking for help, or it’s just that the reporting is wrong. Prior to this report, other reports have come out saying that the number of Veteran suicides is under-reported due to a variety of factors. Reaching these families is also hard, and now that returning Afghanistan war soldiers are coming home, Congress needs to intensify their support for PTSD treatment and postvention when suicide prevention fails.

    Wherever the truth may lie, with Afghanistan Veterans coming home, they will soon face the same challenges all Vets face. Homelessness, the emptiness of civilian life, the housing crisis, the COVID pandemic, extremeism in our political system, and global burning that has temperatures and wild fires raging like never before.

    We wish those returning all the best and for those returning to their families, we wish them more than that. We wish that they get connected to the VA. As lacking as it is, being connected to the local one gives you a better chance at not killing youself. And when you don’t do that, we don’t have to take care of your families once you’re gone.

    ABOUT ONCE A SOLDIER

    Our Veterans are killing themselves in record numbers mostly due to PTSD. An overmatched VA can’t take care of them or their families. We will.

    Soldier suicide leaves Veteran families with thousands of dollars of bills unpaid, mostly bank loans.

    We are the only nonprofit standing with the families after a veteran suicide. Stand with us.

    Our Mission: Become the preferred channel for donors, advocates and volunteers who care about veteran families left behind after a soldier suicide.

    OAS Endorses Fast-Track Psilocybin Research

    OAS Endorses Fast-Track Psilocybin Research

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 25, 2021 – Ponte Vedra, Florida

    Once A Soldier Endorses a Warp Speed Option for Psilocybin Research To Save Veteran Lives

    Psilocybin drugs are the rising starts when it comes to killing PTSD in post-9/11 Veterans

    In recent days, we have modified our website to include the three major psilocybin treatment options researched today. MDMA, ketamine and magic mushrooms have separated themselves as superior to big-pharma anti-depressant medications. They have shown the unique ability to rewire the brain and destroy a Veteran’s PTSD. Marijuana to a lesser extend provides mental relief from PTSD, but psilocybin has that extra break-though into the subconscious. That’s where the real healing, and magic, takes place. For examples of what it’s like to meet your demons and win during a trip, check this out.

    “There is a mounting body of evidence to support our view. And this research is coming from highly-reputable institutions in the US, such as the psilocybin research coming from Johns Hopkins.  We are losing the war on PTSD. PTSD is what kills our Veterans. All forms of micro-dosing these mind-altering drugs shows greater promise than the current schedule of anti-depressants offered by the Veterans’ Administration. We fast-tracked a vaccine for COVID-19, and rightly so. It’s time for that sense of urgency to motivate more help for Veterans with PTSD.” says Dave Barbush, CEO of Once A Soldier.

    Indeed, earlier this year, all of the major Veteran Service Organizations (VSOs) in the nation expressed their support, as well.

    The best scenario for a successful psilocybin treatment plan includes a clinical setting, a trained staff, and a low cost. The best part of the data to date has been that the relief comes fast and is near permanent. Veterans themselves have weighed in on their feelings about it. They like the outcome. Their PTSD is gone. They may not like the process, but they don’t like being dulled by their anti-depressants either.

    Mr. Barbush continued. “Our motivation for fast-tracking research and a parallel training of staff to be “trip buddies” comes from hearing the suicide stories from Veterans families. The horror inflicted upon the Veteran during war is passed down to the family in the years before the suicide. The suicide itself also enables the disorder to continue to grow.

    Furthermore, our position includes a robust go-to market strategy that educates all levels of soldiers and family about PTSD treatments, screenings and practical advice on life insurance and post-suicide options.”

    “Let’s face it, we are losing the war on Veteran suicide at this time. The more effort we’ve put into it to date, the less we’ve seen it working. In fact, the numbers are rising. And those numbers – the branded 22 a day, were probably low to begin with.”